Updating columns in oracle

Cross table update (also known as correlated update, or multiple table update) in Oracle uses non-standard SQL syntax format (non ANSI standard) to update rows in another table. Update data in table A based on two or more common columns in table B.The differences in syntax are quite dramatic compared to other database systems like MS SQL Server or My SQL. Updates based on two or more common columns are normally used for tables where multiple columns work together as a primary key (known as composite primary key).I already know how to update multiple rows using my where clause, but I don't see how to update multiple columns.What is the SQL update syntax to update more than one column?This may seem like a simple question: Update Column a1 in Table A with all data in Column b1 in Table B. I have a table named A containing say 100000 records. HSCODELIST 5 WHERE not exists 6 (SELECT NULL FROM VIStemp. Brao what I suggest then is not to do it in a single sql statement -- just proving that "there are exceptions to every rule". Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- BIN VARCHAR2(10) ACT_SL VARCHAR2(3) ACT_CODE VARCHAR2(11) ACT_VAL NUMBER(14,2) ENTRY_DATE DATE SQL DESC VIS. Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- BIN VARCHAR2(10) ACT_SL VARCHAR2(3) ACT_CODE VARCHAR2(11) ACT_VAL NUMBER(14,2) ENTRY_DATE DATE SQL UPDATE (SELECT DBHSCODELIST. the database needs to know that each row in dbhscodelist will map to AT MOST one row in hscodelist - this mandates a primary or unqiue key constraint on the join columns this is discussed in the original answer above.But I am trapped by the method that without using cursor to achieve it. I have another table B containg 10,000 records of incremented and edited records of A table. I am using the following codes to append data from B to A. Normally, I would try to use a single sql statment -- here, due to the "data being spread all over the place", and being distributed and all. We have a 2 CPU machine where at normal times, the topmost entry in top command shows only .2 or .3 percentage of CPU use. This is on a test database where nothing else is going on concurrently.

Many applications update all of the columns in a table -- setting them to their old value, rather then trying to figure out exactly which columns have been updated by the client. create or replace trigger test_trigger 2 after update of x,y on test 3 for each row 4 begin 5 if updating( 'X' ) then 6 dbms_output.put_line( 'X is being updated' ); 7 end if; 8 9 if updating( 'Y' ) then 10 dbms_output.put_line( 'Y is being updated' ); 11 end if; 12 end; 13 / Trigger created.

In this article, we are going to look at four scenarios for Oracle cross table update. Category_ID) where exists ( select * from Categories b where b. These columns uniquely identify a record in a table.

Suppose we have two tables Categories and Categories_Test. The common column in the two tables is CATEGORY_ID. Please note that query below is used for illustration purpose because Category_ID alone is primary key.

JDBCExecution Exception: 17004 TEIID11013: TEIID11004 Error executing statement(s): [Prepared Values: ['TESTVARCHAR'] SQL: UPDATE "TESTADMIN"."TEST" SET "Test NVar Char Col" = ? JDBCUpdate Execution.execute Translated Command(JDBCUpdate Execution.java:211) at org.teiid.

JDBCUpdate Execution.execute(JDBCUpdate Execution.java:71) at edm.teiid.translator. Edm Update Execution.execute(Edm Update Execution.java:34) at org.internal.datamgr.